Wednesday, March 17, 2021

A little Green for St. Patricks Day

This beautiful quilt arrived at my studio a few weeks ago and after a few back and forth texts with the maker, we finalized this as the quilting motifs. 

Pattern is Steam Punk by Jen Kingwell, and it was both hand and machine pieced.  The fabric choices are so lovely in this and the white sashing really frames all the colors and makes for a fresh look.

This scrappy green and white top has been created using the "bonus" blocks from a previous project.  I get to do "whatever" on these and it gives me a chance to play.  I love how this one turned out.

 

Here is the back.  I've had several requests for this freehand all over motif since posting it on FB/IG  One of my customers has named it Kansas Winds.

 This hand pieced quilt is the Brimfield Star pattern.  Bright colors layered on navy grunge make for a vibrant quilt.

The grunge background really makes this interesting, vs using a solid navy.  The very narrow inset border frames all the "stars" and each one shines as an individual medallion.
A bit of ruler work and some curves was all the blocks needed, but the maker wanted feathers, lots of feathers flowing all around and filling the background.  I kept the stitching out of the narrow sash, and did a separate border feather; one that starts in the corners and meets at the sides.   This method allows for the border feathers to travel in all directions.
It's always such a thrill to see the plain cloth become transformed with thread. I am moving my studio 1.5 miles down the road, but that still requires me to put my hands on every...single...thing....in my studio. Oh good grief, I have so many little things to pack, move, and relocate in their new home. Have you moved your studio? Any tips? I shall report back in about a month........ Keep stitching, Sharon

Sunday, February 14, 2021

The Blue House on the Corner

The blocks for this quilt were pieced during my quarantine in Sept 2020  The pattern for this house block is from the October 2020 issue of American Patchwork and Quilting. My initial idea was to make all the blocks in different colors, and after making a test block in blue, my fabric pull quickly turned into a stack of gorgeous browns and creams.

Some things got a little mixed up in the construction of the blocks and it seemed that I either didn't catch it, or didn't think it was worthy of a seam ripper.

This oops is so hard to see that I had to blow up the photo to figure out why I had it in this post!

When the siding went on the materials got a bit mixed up as well.  Being all browns, I guess it was a bit much to keep all the prints separated. Or becausse I was in quarantine and some things seemed to have lost their importance.

More mixed backgrounds

Mixed siding

Years ago I saw a house pattern with stars as the setting post.  I've had a photo kick around my studio for years, the houses were black and white, and the stars were red.   It was very striking.  My first house quilt had no corner posts and here was my chance to put the stars in the sashing.  And yet, I ended up with a 9 patch.  It would have been faster to strip piece these blocks, but they wouldn't have the scrappy charm that you get when you sew one square at a time.

Here is the pattern from the APQ issue.  Stars and scrappy houses and all, and yet, my top ended up brown.  With a blue house on the corner.  My first house was a blue house on the corner.  So when I put the top together, I kept that test block and added a little touch of blue in the 9 patches.



 The top is complete, I've done my scant 1/8" stay stitch all around the perimeter.  That stay stitching will keep the edges from stretching out, AND it will keep my seams from popping open when it gets loaded and stretched on the longarm frame. 

Have you made a house quilt? If not, why not? This one has a paper pieced roof and it came together with no issues at all. Build a house, build a village, build a city. There are so many great patterns out there. Keep stitching, Sharon